France - Case Study 1
TYPE:
Urban micro-farm
NAME:
Nantes micro-farm 1
OBJECTIVE:
Communication - Food production
SIZE:
Size of the farm : 960m2 ; Cultivated area : 650m2

 

DESCRIPTION:
Nantes micro-farm 1 is a micro-farm settled in the center of Nantes in 2016 with an area of about 960 m². It is operated by a farmer. The cultivated area is about 650m² on raised beds where vegetables, fruits and aromatic plants are cultivated. The prodution is sold to a restaurant. The farm hosts some visitors.


DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops and the quantity of food that has been grown over two years, during 2019 and 2020. The last two sections of this page are dedicated to transport and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening. We decided to include transport in these charts because the fuel that is sometimes used for transport adds to the resources used to grow food.

In the last section of the page, two charts show immaterial benefits in terms of motivations for our gardeners to work in this community garden and the impact that this work generates on their health, socialisation and more. Transport, motivations and impacts were identified on the basis of a survey amongst gardeners and volunteers conducted in 2019.

All charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in two bars the progressive consumption of water during 2019 and 2020, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilograms of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption.

FOOD

The harvest charts, rather than showing harvest per month, show the weight of the crops harvested together with the quantity of kilograms per m2 of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which in some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the number of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers. This chart refers to trips in 2019.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. This chart refers to impacts and motivations recorded in 2019.

France - Case Study 2
TYPE:
Peri-urban micro-farm
NAME:
Nantes micro-farm 2
OBJECTIVE:
Food production
SIZE:
Size of the farm : 2500m2 ; Cultivated area : 1368m2

 

DESCRIPTION:
Nantes micro-farm 2 is a micro-farm under a greenhouse settled in the periphery of Nantes in 2010 with an area of about 2500 m². It is operated by a farmer. The cultivated area is about 1500 m². where vegetables are cultivated. The prodution is sold to restaurants. The farm hosts some visitors, students.


DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops and the quantity of food that has been grown over two years, during 2019 and 2020. The last two sections of this page are dedicated to transport and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening. We decided to include transport in these charts because the fuel that is sometimes used for transport adds to the resources used to grow food.

In the last section of the page, two charts show immaterial benefits in terms of motivations for our gardeners to work in this community garden and the impact that this work generates on their health, socialisation and more. Transport, motivations and impacts were identified on the basis of a survey amongst gardeners and volunteers conducted in 2019.

All charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in two bars the progressive consumption of water during 2019 and 2020, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilograms of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption.

FOOD

The harvest charts, rather than showing harvest per month, show the weight of the crops harvested together with the quantity of kilograms per m2 of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which in some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the number of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers. This chart refers to trips in 2019.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. This chart refers to impacts and motivations recorded in 2019.

France - Case Study 3
TYPE:
Allotment
NAME:
Le jardin des Eglantiers
ADDRESS:
Avenue des Églantiers - Nantes - 44300
OBJECTIVE:
Leisure - social cohesion
SIZE:
Average size of a garden ~154m2 ; Average size under cultivation per garden : ~67,5m2

 

DESCRIPTION:
Le Jardins des Eglantiers is in Nantes, and is one of the 25 allotments garden of Nantes, created in 1982. It is located in the north of city with 79 plots on 22 820 m². It is managed by an association, "Association Le Jardin des Eglantiers". The main purpose of the garden is to give access to land to citizens of the neighborhood where they can grow vegetables, fruits and flowers on a total area for cultivation of about 9 298m².

 

  > France - Case Study 3 G1

DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops and the quantity of food that has been grown over two years, during 2019 and 2020. The last two sections of this page are dedicated to transport and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening. We decided to include transport in these charts because the fuel that is sometimes used for transport adds to the resources used to grow food.

In the last section of the page, two charts show immaterial benefits in terms of motivations for our gardeners to work in this community garden and the impact that this work generates on their health, socialisation and more. Transport, motivations and impacts were identified on the basis of a survey amongst gardeners and volunteers conducted in 2019.

All charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in two bars the progressive consumption of water during 2019 and 2020, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilograms of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption.

FOOD

The harvest charts, rather than showing harvest per month, show the weight of the crops harvested together with the quantity of kilograms per m2 of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which in some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the number of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers. This chart refers to trips in 2019.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. This chart refers to impacts and motivations recorded in 2019.

  > France - Case Study 3 G2

DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops and the quantity of food that has been grown over two years, during 2019 and 2020. The last two sections of this page are dedicated to transport and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening. We decided to include transport in these charts because the fuel that is sometimes used for transport adds to the resources used to grow food.

In the last section of the page, two charts show immaterial benefits in terms of motivations for our gardeners to work in this community garden and the impact that this work generates on their health, socialisation and more. Transport, motivations and impacts were identified on the basis of a survey amongst gardeners and volunteers conducted in 2019.

All charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in two bars the progressive consumption of water during 2019 and 2020, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilograms of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption.

FOOD

The harvest charts, rather than showing harvest per month, show the weight of the crops harvested together with the quantity of kilograms per m2 of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which in some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the number of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers. This chart refers to trips in 2019.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. This chart refers to impacts and motivations recorded in 2019.

  > France - Case Study 3 G3

DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops and the quantity of food that has been grown over two years, during 2019 and 2020. The last two sections of this page are dedicated to transport and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening. We decided to include transport in these charts because the fuel that is sometimes used for transport adds to the resources used to grow food.

In the last section of the page, two charts show immaterial benefits in terms of motivations for our gardeners to work in this community garden and the impact that this work generates on their health, socialisation and more. Transport, motivations and impacts were identified on the basis of a survey amongst gardeners and volunteers conducted in 2019.

All charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in two bars the progressive consumption of water during 2019 and 2020, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilograms of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption.

FOOD

The harvest charts, rather than showing harvest per month, show the weight of the crops harvested together with the quantity of kilograms per m2 of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which in some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the number of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers. This chart refers to trips in 2019.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. This chart refers to impacts and motivations recorded in 2019.

  > France - Case Study 3 G4

DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops and the quantity of food that has been grown over two years, during 2019 and 2020. The last two sections of this page are dedicated to transport and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening. We decided to include transport in these charts because the fuel that is sometimes used for transport adds to the resources used to grow food.

In the last section of the page, two charts show immaterial benefits in terms of motivations for our gardeners to work in this community garden and the impact that this work generates on their health, socialisation and more. Transport, motivations and impacts were identified on the basis of a survey amongst gardeners and volunteers conducted in 2019.

All charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in two bars the progressive consumption of water during 2019 and 2020, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilograms of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption.

FOOD

The harvest charts, rather than showing harvest per month, show the weight of the crops harvested together with the quantity of kilograms per m2 of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which in some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the number of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers. This chart refers to trips in 2019.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. This chart refers to impacts and motivations recorded in 2019.

  > France - Case Study 3 G5

DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops and the quantity of food that has been grown over two years, during 2019 and 2020. The last two sections of this page are dedicated to transport and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening. We decided to include transport in these charts because the fuel that is sometimes used for transport adds to the resources used to grow food.

In the last section of the page, two charts show immaterial benefits in terms of motivations for our gardeners to work in this community garden and the impact that this work generates on their health, socialisation and more. Transport, motivations and impacts were identified on the basis of a survey amongst gardeners and volunteers conducted in 2019.

All charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in two bars the progressive consumption of water during 2019 and 2020, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilograms of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption.

FOOD

The harvest charts, rather than showing harvest per month, show the weight of the crops harvested together with the quantity of kilograms per m2 of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which in some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the number of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers. This chart refers to trips in 2019.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. This chart refers to impacts and motivations recorded in 2019.

  > France - Case Study 3 G6

DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops and the quantity of food that has been grown over two years, during 2019 and 2020. The last two sections of this page are dedicated to transport and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening. We decided to include transport in these charts because the fuel that is sometimes used for transport adds to the resources used to grow food.

In the last section of the page, two charts show immaterial benefits in terms of motivations for our gardeners to work in this community garden and the impact that this work generates on their health, socialisation and more. Transport, motivations and impacts were identified on the basis of a survey amongst gardeners and volunteers conducted in 2019.

All charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in two bars the progressive consumption of water during 2019 and 2020, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilograms of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption.

FOOD

The harvest charts, rather than showing harvest per month, show the weight of the crops harvested together with the quantity of kilograms per m2 of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which in some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the number of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers. This chart refers to trips in 2019.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. This chart refers to impacts and motivations recorded in 2019.

  > France - Case Study 3 G7

DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops and the quantity of food that has been grown over two years, during 2019 and 2020. The last two sections of this page are dedicated to transport and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening. We decided to include transport in these charts because the fuel that is sometimes used for transport adds to the resources used to grow food.

In the last section of the page, two charts show immaterial benefits in terms of motivations for our gardeners to work in this community garden and the impact that this work generates on their health, socialisation and more. Transport, motivations and impacts were identified on the basis of a survey amongst gardeners and volunteers conducted in 2019.

All charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in two bars the progressive consumption of water during 2019 and 2020, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilograms of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption.

FOOD

The harvest charts, rather than showing harvest per month, show the weight of the crops harvested together with the quantity of kilograms per m2 of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which in some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the number of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers. This chart refers to trips in 2019.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. This chart refers to impacts and motivations recorded in 2019.

  > France - Case Study 3 G8

DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops and the quantity of food that has been grown over two years, during 2019 and 2020. The last two sections of this page are dedicated to transport and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening. We decided to include transport in these charts because the fuel that is sometimes used for transport adds to the resources used to grow food.

In the last section of the page, two charts show immaterial benefits in terms of motivations for our gardeners to work in this community garden and the impact that this work generates on their health, socialisation and more. Transport, motivations and impacts were identified on the basis of a survey amongst gardeners and volunteers conducted in 2019.

All charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in two bars the progressive consumption of water during 2019 and 2020, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilograms of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption.

FOOD

The harvest charts, rather than showing harvest per month, show the weight of the crops harvested together with the quantity of kilograms per m2 of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which in some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the number of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers. This chart refers to trips in 2019.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. This chart refers to impacts and motivations recorded in 2019.

  > France - Case Study 3 G9

DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops and the quantity of food that has been grown over two years, during 2019 and 2020. The last two sections of this page are dedicated to transport and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening. We decided to include transport in these charts because the fuel that is sometimes used for transport adds to the resources used to grow food.

In the last section of the page, two charts show immaterial benefits in terms of motivations for our gardeners to work in this community garden and the impact that this work generates on their health, socialisation and more. Transport, motivations and impacts were identified on the basis of a survey amongst gardeners and volunteers conducted in 2019.

All charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in two bars the progressive consumption of water during 2019 and 2020, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilograms of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption.

FOOD

The harvest charts, rather than showing harvest per month, show the weight of the crops harvested together with the quantity of kilograms per m2 of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which in some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the number of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers. This chart refers to trips in 2019.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. This chart refers to impacts and motivations recorded in 2019.

  > France - Case Study 3 G10

DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops and the quantity of food that has been grown over two years, during 2019 and 2020. The last two sections of this page are dedicated to transport and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening. We decided to include transport in these charts because the fuel that is sometimes used for transport adds to the resources used to grow food.

In the last section of the page, two charts show immaterial benefits in terms of motivations for our gardeners to work in this community garden and the impact that this work generates on their health, socialisation and more. Transport, motivations and impacts were identified on the basis of a survey amongst gardeners and volunteers conducted in 2019.

All charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in two bars the progressive consumption of water during 2019 and 2020, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilograms of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption.

FOOD

The harvest charts, rather than showing harvest per month, show the weight of the crops harvested together with the quantity of kilograms per m2 of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which in some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the number of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers. This chart refers to trips in 2019.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. This chart refers to impacts and motivations recorded in 2019.

  > France - Case Study 3 G11

DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops and the quantity of food that has been grown over two years, during 2019 and 2020. The last two sections of this page are dedicated to transport and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening. We decided to include transport in these charts because the fuel that is sometimes used for transport adds to the resources used to grow food.

In the last section of the page, two charts show immaterial benefits in terms of motivations for our gardeners to work in this community garden and the impact that this work generates on their health, socialisation and more. Transport, motivations and impacts were identified on the basis of a survey amongst gardeners and volunteers conducted in 2019.

All charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in two bars the progressive consumption of water during 2019 and 2020, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilograms of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption.

FOOD

The harvest charts, rather than showing harvest per month, show the weight of the crops harvested together with the quantity of kilograms per m2 of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which in some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the number of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers. This chart refers to trips in 2019.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. This chart refers to impacts and motivations recorded in 2019.

France - Case Study 4
TYPE:
Urban micro-farm
NAME:
Paris Micro-farm 1
ADDRESS:
Aubervilliers
OBJECTIVE:
Professional insertion - food production
SIZE:
Size of the farm : 700m2 ; Cultivated space : 400m2

 

DESCRIPTION:
Paris micro-farm 1 is a rooftop farm aiming to produce fresh and seasonal vegetables and create job through professional insertion. The project exist since 2016 on the roof of a commercial center.


DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops and the quantity of food that has been grown over two years, during 2019 and 2020. The last two sections of this page are dedicated to transport and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening. We decided to include transport in these charts because the fuel that is sometimes used for transport adds to the resources used to grow food.

In the last section of the page, two charts show immaterial benefits in terms of motivations for our gardeners to work in this community garden and the impact that this work generates on their health, socialisation and more. Transport, motivations and impacts were identified on the basis of a survey amongst gardeners and volunteers conducted in 2019.

All charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in two bars the progressive consumption of water during 2019 and 2020, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilograms of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption.

FOOD

The harvest charts, rather than showing harvest per month, show the weight of the crops harvested together with the quantity of kilograms per m2 of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which in some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the number of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers. This chart refers to trips in 2019.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. This chart refers to impacts and motivations recorded in 2019.

France - Case Study 5
TYPE:
Urban micro-farm
NAME:
Paris Micro-farm 2
ADDRESS:
Paris
OBJECTIVE:
Pedagogic - social cohesion - food production
SIZE:
Size of the farm : 5800m2

 

DESCRIPTION:
The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops and the quantity of food that has been grown over two years, during 2019 and 2020. The last two sections of this page are dedicated to transport and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening. We decided to include transport in these charts because the fuel that is sometimes used for transport adds to the resources used to grow food.
In the last section of the page, two charts show immaterial benefits in terms of motivations for our gardeners to work in this community garden and the impact that this work generates on their health, socialisation and more. Transport, motivations and impacts were identified on the basis of a survey amongst gardeners and volunteers conducted in 2019.
All charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.


DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops, the quantity of food that has been grown and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening, between March and the end of 2019. Charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in two bars the progressive consumption of water during 2019 and 2020, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilograms of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption.

FOOD

The harvest charts, rather than showing harvest per month, show the weight of the crops harvested together with the quantity of kilograms per m2 of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which in some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the number of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers. This chart refers to trips in 2019.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. This chart refers to impacts and motivations recorded in 2019.

France - Case Study 6
TYPE:
Urban micro-farm
NAME:
Paris Micro-farm 3
ADDRESS:
Paris
OBJECTIVE:
Pedagogic - social - food production
SIZE:
Size of the farm : 1790m2 ; Cultivated area : 273m2

 

DESCRIPTION:
Paris micro-farm 3 is a rooftop farm on top of a school with the main goal of teaching students and community members about food, agriculture, nutrition, and environmental responsibility. Students engage with the farm through a dedicated class, and through open hours with a club. Community members are welcome to volunteer on the farm during certain hours each week. Although the main products from the farm are edible crops, they also grow a large amount of flowers. Their products are sold to local restaurants or to the community at a farm stand, and some crops like strawberries usually don't make it off the farm and are eaten by students. Growing practices are intended to promote environmental sustainability, such as companion planting, zero pesticides, and reusing urban waste such as food waste, tree clippings and beer dredge as compost. The project is lead by an association working in urban agriculture.


DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops and the quantity of food that has been grown over two years, during 2019 and 2020. The last two sections of this page are dedicated to transport and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening. We decided to include transport in these charts because the fuel that is sometimes used for transport adds to the resources used to grow food.

In the last section of the page, two charts show immaterial benefits in terms of motivations for our gardeners to work in this community garden and the impact that this work generates on their health, socialisation and more. Transport, motivations and impacts were identified on the basis of a survey amongst gardeners and volunteers conducted in 2019.

All charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in two bars the progressive consumption of water during 2019 and 2020, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilograms of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption.

FOOD

The harvest charts, rather than showing harvest per month, show the weight of the crops harvested together with the quantity of kilograms per m2 of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which in some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the number of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers. This chart refers to trips in 2019.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. This chart refers to impacts and motivations recorded in 2019.

Germany - Case Study 1
TYPE:
Allotment
NAME OF THE ALLOTMENT:
DE01-Osterbecke
ADDRESS:
Grummerstr. 2-4, Bochum (Riemke), 44807
SURFACE AREA:
441

 

DESCRIPTION:
DE01-Osterbecke is one of 63 allotments garden plots in the Osterbecke Allotment Association, located at the northwestern outskirts of the city of Bochum. Bochum is one of eleven cities and four counties that together form the Ruhr Area. It has about 365,000 inhabitants and consists of 30 boroughs. The cases study plot is located in the borough of Riemke, a former mine worker area, which belongs to the municipality district of "Mitte" (Central) and has got about 7,600 inhabitants.
The case study plot has a total size of about 440m², of which 365m² are used for cultivation (lawns and flower beds included) and 130m² are used for producing vegetables and fruits. As a typical German allotment plot it includes a brick garden-house of 24m².


DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops, the quantity of food that has been grown and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening, between March and the end of October 2019. Charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in a bar the progressive consumption of water and electricity across some months of the year, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilogram of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption.

FOOD

The harvest chart, rather than showing harvest per month, shows the weight of the crops that were picked together with the quantity of kilograms per meter squared of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which in some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the quantity of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. The charts refer to answers given by all German case study participants and not to one single allotment plot holder.

Germany - Case Study 2
TYPE:
Allotment
NAME OF THE ALLOTMENT:
DE02-Carolinenglück
ADDRESS:
Overdycker Str. 100, Bochum (Hamme), 44793
WEBSITE:
https://www.kgv-carolinenglueck-bochum.de
SURFACE AREA:
860

 

DESCRIPTION:
DE02-Caronlinenglück is an allotment garden in the Carolinenglück Allotment Association, located at the northwestern outskirts of the city of Bochum. Bochum is one of eleven cities and four counties that together form the Ruhr Area. It has about 365,000 inhabitants and consists of 30 boroughs. The allotment garden is located in the borough of Hamme, a former mine worker area, which belongs to the municipality district of "Mitte" (Central) and has got about 15,500 inhabitants. The Carolinenglück allotment garden assocation was founded 1947 for staff members of Carolinenglück colliery in which until 1964 coal was mined.
The case study plot has a total size of about 860 m², consisting to two regular allotment plots, of which about 760 m² are used for mixed cultivation (flower beds, vegetables and fruits). As a result of the merging of two garden plots, there are two buildings: a wooden gazebo and the former brick garden house, which is only used as a tool shed.


DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops, the quantity of food that has been grown and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening, between March and the end of October 2019. Charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in a bar the progressive consumption of water and electricity across some months of the year, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilogram of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption.

FOOD

The harvest chart, rather than showing harvest per month, shows the weight of the crops that were picked together with the quantity of kilograms per meter squared of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which in some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the quantity of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. The charts refer to answers given by all German case study participants and not to one single allotment plot holder.

Germany - Case Study 3
TYPE:
Allotment
NAME OF THE ALLOTMENT:
DE03-Hansa
ADDRESS:
Burgholzstr. 160 - Dortmund (Innenstadt-Nord) - 44145
SURFACE AREA:
400

 

DESCRIPTION:
DE03-Hansa is an allotment garden in the KGV Hansa e.V. allotment association located in the northern outskirts of Dortmund. Dortund is the third-largest city of Germany's most populous federal state of North Rhine-Westphalia and it has 587,000 inhabitants. The allotment garden is located in an industrial area and is surrounded by commercial and industrial sites. The Hansa allotment garden association represents a very typical example of a german allotment garden. The garden is run by a retired couple and has a space of 400 m² out of which 300 m² are used for mixed cultivation and around 100 m² are used for pure food production.


DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops, the quantity of food that has been grown and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening, between March and the end of October 2019. Charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in a bar the progressive consumption of water and electricity across some months of the year, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilogram of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption.

FOOD

The harvest chart, rather than showing harvest per month, shows the weight of the crops that were picked together with the quantity of kilograms per meter squared of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which in some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the quantity of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. The charts refer to answers given by all German case study participants and not to one single allotment plot holder.

Germany - Case Study 4
TYPE:
Allotment
NAME OF THE ALLOTMENT:
DE04-Hansa
ADDRESS:
Burgholzstr. 160 - Dortmund (Innenstadt-Nord) - 44145
SURFACE AREA:
290

 

DESCRIPTION:
DE04-Hansa is an allotment garden in the KGV Hansa e.V. allotment association located in the northern outskirts of Dortmund. Dortund is the third-largest city of Germany's most populous federal state of North Rhine-Westphalia and it has 587,000 inhabitants. The allotment garden is located in an industrial area and is surrounded by commercial and industrial sites. The Hansa allotment garden association represents a very typical example of a german allotment garden. The garden has a space of 300 m² out of which 250 m² are used for mixed cultivation.


DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops, the quantity of food that has been grown and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening, between March and the end of October 2019. Charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in a bar the progressive consumption of water and electricity across some months of the year, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilogram of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption.

FOOD

The harvest chart, rather than showing harvest per month, shows the weight of the crops that were picked together with the quantity of kilograms per meter squared of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which in some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the quantity of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. The charts refer to answers given by all German case study participants and not to one single allotment plot holder.

Germany - Case Study 5
TYPE:
Allotment
NAME OF THE ALLOTMENT:
DE05-LWL
ADDRESS:
Breiter Weg 23 - Lünen (Horstmar) - 44532
SURFACE AREA:
851

 

DESCRIPTION:
The regional association Westphalia and Lippe of the allotment gardeners runs an office and its own training centre with teaching and learning gardens in Lünen, a medium-sized city with about 86,500 inhabitants a the northeast fringe of the Ruhr Area and near to Dortmund. The association represents the interests of its 72,000 members, organises courses at its own school on questions of near-natural gardening, nature and environmental protection and informs and advises members, citizens, media and cities on central questions of allotment gardening through publications, exhibitions and information services.
The case study garden consists of the southern parts of the teaching garden with a size of about 850 m², of which 768 m² are used for cultivation (flower beds, lawn, vegetables and fruit). On 270 m² vegetables and fruits are produced. Besides two wooden houses that offer space for storing garden tools and a house for bee-keeping the greenhouse in the northern part of the garden also is included in the case study.


DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops, the quantity of food that has been grown and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening, between March and the end of October 2019. Charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in a bar the progressive consumption of water across some months of the year, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilogram of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption. This garden is maintained without using electric or other energy.

FOOD

The harvest chart, rather than showing harvest per month, shows the weight of the crops that were picked together with the quantity of kilograms per meter squared of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which in some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the quantity of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. The charts refer to answers given by all German case study participants and not to one single allotment plot holder.

Germany - Case Study 6
TYPE:
Allotment
NAME OF THE ALLOTMENT:
DE06-Lütkenbeck
ADDRESS:
Lütkenbecker Weg 53 - Münster (Hafen) - 48155
SURFACE AREA:
520

 

DESCRIPTION:
DE06-Lütkenbeck is a garden in the Lütkenbeck allotment association at the south-eastern fringe of Münster, a city located North of the Ruhr Area with about 262,000 inhabitants. The garden is located close to the harbor of Münster. The Lütkenbeck association was founded in 1921 and includes 49 garden parcels. The case study plot has a total size of about 520 m², of which about 423 m² are used for flower beds and lawn and 125 m² are used for food production (vegetables and fruits). As a typical German allotment plot it includes a garden-house of 24 m².


DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops, the quantity of food that has been grown and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening, between March and the end of October 2019. Charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in a bar the progressive consumption of water and electricity across some months of the year, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilogram of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption.

FOOD

The harvest chart, rather than showing harvest per month, shows the weight of the crops that were picked together with the quantity of kilograms per meter squared of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which in some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the quantity of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. The charts refer to answers given by all German case study participants and not to one single allotment plot holder.

Germany - Case Study 7
TYPE:
Allotment
NAME OF THE ALLOTMENT:
DE07-Am Erlenbusch
ADDRESS:
Langemarckstr. - Münster (Uppenberg) - 48147
SURFACE AREA:
550

 

DESCRIPTION:
DE07 - Am Erlenbusch is an allotment plot in the Am Erlenbusch Allotment association which is located at the northern urban fringe of Münster, a city located North of the Ruhr Area with about 262,000 inhabitants. The entire allotment garden complex is comparably small with a size of 8.000 m² and only 15 garden parcels. The garden association was founded in 1922. The association stresses the potential of gardens for biodiversity, which is also reflected in the applied practices and in the appearance of the gardens, in which the gardeners strive to build wildlife- and eco-friendly gardens. The case study site has a size of 540 m² of which 140 m² are dedicated to food production.


DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops, the quantity of food that has been grown and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening, between March and the end of October 2019. Charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in a bar the progressive consumption of water and electricity across some months of the year, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilogram of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption. Most of the water used was reported in October 2019 when the water-meter was read but used all over the year.

FOOD

The harvest chart, rather than showing harvest per month, shows the weight of the crops that were picked together with the quantity of kilograms per meter squared of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which in some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the quantity of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. The charts refer to answers given by all German case study participants and not to one single allotment plot holder.

Germany - Case Study 8
TYPE:
Allotment
NAME OF THE ALLOTMENT:
DE08-Große Dahlkamp
ADDRESS:
Wolbecker Str. 176 - Münster (Hafen) - 48155
WEBSITE:
http://kgv-grosse-dahlkamp.de
SURFACE AREA:
540

 

DESCRIPTION:
DE08-Große Dahlkamp is an allotment plot in the Große Dahlkamp Allotment association which is located at the south-eastern urban fringe of Münster, a city located North of the Ruhr Area with about 262,000 inhabitants. The allotment garden is located in the borough of St. Mauritz, which belongs to the municipality district of "Ost" (East) and has got about 21,000 inhabitants. The Große Dahlkamp allotment garden assocation was founded 1921 on a former large cattle pasture that was made available as grave land for the creation of gardens.
The case study plot has a total size of about 540 m², of which about 335 m² are used for flower beds and lawn and 140 m² for food production (vegetables and fruits). As a typical German allotment plot it includes a brick garden-house of 24 m².


DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops, the quantity of food that has been grown and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening, between March and the end of October 2019. Charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in a bar the progressive consumption of water and electricity across some months of the year, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilogram of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption.

FOOD

The harvest chart, rather than showing harvest per month, shows the weight of the crops that were picked together with the quantity of kilograms per meter squared of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which in some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the quantity of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. The charts refer to answers given by all German case study participants and not to one single allotment plot holder.

Germany - Case Study 9
TYPE:
Allotment
NAME OF THE ALLOTMENT:
DE09-Langemarck
ADDRESS:
Langemarckstr. 73 - Münster (Uppenberg) - 48149
SURFACE AREA:
423

 

DESCRIPTION:
DE-09 Langemarck is an allotment plot in the Langemarck allotment association which is located at the northern urban fringe of Münster, a city located North of the Ruhr Area with about 262,000 inhabitants. The garden has a total size of 420 m² out of which 200 m² are dedicated to food production. The space is run by an artist, who also uses the garden for art and cultural events, such as lectures, concerts and more.


DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops, the quantity of food that has been grown and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening, between March and the end of October 2019. Charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in a bar the progressive consumption of water and electricity across some months of the year, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilogram of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption.

FOOD

The harvest chart, rather than showing harvest per month, shows the weight of the crops that were picked together with the quantity of kilograms per meter squared of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which in some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the quantity of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. The charts refer to answers given by all German case study participants and not to one single allotment plot holder.

Germany - Case Study 10
TYPE:
Allotment
NAME OF THE ALLOTMENT:
DE10-Große Dahlkamp
ADDRESS:
Wolbecker Str. 156 - Münster (Hafen) - 48155
WEBSITE:
http://kgv-grosse-dahlkamp.de/
SURFACE AREA:
700

 

DESCRIPTION:
DE10-Große Dahlkamp is an allotment plot in the Große Dahlkamp von 1921 allotment association which is located at the south-eastern urban fringe of Münster, a city located North of the Ruhr Area with about 262,000 inhabitants. The allotment garden is located in the borough of St. Mauritz, which belongs to the municipality district of "Ost" (East) and has got about 21,000 inhabitants. The Große Dahlkamp allotment garden assocation was founded 1921 on a former large cattle pasture that was made available as grave land for the creation of gardens.
The case study plot has a total size of about 700m² due to the fact that the tenants have rented two adjacent allotment sites. The total are for cultivation for lawn, flower beds and food production is about 600 m² of which 180m² are used for growing vegetables and fruits. One of the two former brick-built gardenhouses has been demolished already while on the tenants have just started to replace the second by a modern house constructed from wood. as the site neighbours directly to orchards, tenants have established intensive bee-keeping facilities with 14 bee-hives.


DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops, the quantity of food that has been grown and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening, between March and the end of October 2019. Charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in a bar the progressive consumption of water and electricity across some months of the year, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilogram of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption. The figure on water use may not reflect the amount of water used for watering the plants in this garden as partly a neighbour also used the hose with the water meter applied, and the children of the gardener liked playing with the lawn sprinkler.

FOOD

The harvest chart, rather than showing harvest per month, shows the weight of the crops that were picked together with the quantity of kilograms per meter squared of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which in some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the quantity of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. The charts refer to answers given by all German case study participants and not to one single allotment plot holder.

Germany - Case Study 11
TYPE:
Allotment
NAME OF THE ALLOTMENT:
DE11-Hansa
ADDRESS:
Boelkeweg 3 a - Münster (Loddenheide) - 48155
SURFACE AREA:
400

 

DESCRIPTION:
DE11-Hansa is an allotment plot in the Hansa Allotment association which is located at the south-eastern urban fringe of Münster, a city located North of the Ruhr Area with about 262,000 inhabitants. The allotment garden is located in the borough of Gremmendorf, which belongs to the municipality district of "Süd-Ost" (South-East) and has got about 12,000 inhabitants. The Hansa allotment garden assocation was founded 1912 has got 39 plots on 18.5 ha.
The case study plot has a total size of about 400 m². The total area for cultivation for flower beds and food production is about 328 m² of which 140 m² are used for growing vegetables and fruits.


DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops, the quantity of food that has been grown and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening, between March and the end of October 2019. Charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in a bar the progressive consumption of water and electricity across some months of the year, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilogram of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption.

FOOD

The harvest chart, rather than showing harvest per month, shows the weight of the crops that were picked together with the quantity of kilograms per meter squared of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which in some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the quantity of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. The charts refer to answers given by all German case study participants and not to one single allotment plot holder.

Germany - Case Study 12
TYPE:
Allotment
NAME OF THE ALLOTMENT:
DE12-Kurenholt
ADDRESS:
Kurenholtweg 1 - Oelde - 59302
SURFACE AREA:
400
Poland - Case Study 1
TYPE:
Allotment
NAME:
TULIPAN 1

DESCRIPTION:

TULIPAN 1 - is in Gorzów Wielkopolski, a city with nearly 125,000 inhabitants located in the west of Poland and is an allotment plot within Family Allotment Garden "Tulipan", which is associated with Polish Allotment Gardeners Federation, branch of Gorzów Wielkopolski. The allotment garden was established in 1982 and is located in the south of the city, surrounded by agriculture areas.
Tulipan 1 is one of 255 plots included in the allotment garden. The total area of the case study plot is 411 m2. The current user has been taking care of the plot for nearly 38 years, that is since the very beginning of the allotment garden. The main benefit of having a plot is the opportunity to rest and recreation, but also to have healthy own fruits and vegetables. The cultivation area occupies 37% of the plot with vegetables such as parsley, leek, carrot, celeriac, green beans, butter lettuce and tomato.


DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops and the quantity of food that has been grown over two years, between March and October 2019, and March and October 2020. The last two sections of this page are dedicated to transport and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening. We decided to include transport in these charts because the fuel that is sometimes used for transport adds to the resources used to grow food.

In the last section of the page, two charts show immaterial benefits in terms of motivations for our gardeners to work in this community garden and the impact that this work generates on their health, socialisation and more. Transport, motivations and impacts were identified on the basis of a survey amongst gardeners and volunteers conducted in 2019.

All charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in two bars the progressive consumption of water and electricity from March to October 2019 and 2020, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilogram of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption. The garden is located next to offices and the electricity meter shows the overall consumption of the garden and offices. Electricity consumption of the garden is therefore based on an estimate and includes the energy consumed by the gardeners using facilities of the offices.

FOOD

The harvest charts, rather than showing harvest per month, show the weight of the crops harvested together with the quantity of kilograms per m2 of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which in some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the quantity of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers. For Polish case studies, commuting to the garden was recorded by only one gardener/plot user, even if the garden/plot was used by other people (e.g. other family members). This chart refers to trips in 2019 and 2020.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. This chart refers to impacts and motivations recorded in 2019.

Poland - Case Study 2
TYPE:
Allotment
NAME:
TULIPAN 2

 

DESCRIPTION:
TULIPAN 2 - is in Gorzów Wielkopolski, a city with nearly 125,000 inhabitants located in the west of Poland and is an allotment plot within Family Allotment Garden "Tulipan" which is associated with Polish Allotment Gardeners Federation, branch of Gorzów Wielkopolski. The allotment garden was established in 1982 and is located in the south of the city, surrounded by agriculture areas.
Tulipan 2 is one of 255 plots included in the allotment garden. The total area of the case study plot is 400 m2. The current user has been taking care of the plot for 34 years (since 1986). The main benefit of having a plot is the opportunity to rest and recreation, but also to have healthy own fruits and vegetables. The cultivation area occupies 43% of the plot with a wide range of vegetables and fruits.


DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops and the quantity of food that has been grown over two years, between March and October 2019, and March and October 2020. The last two sections of this page are dedicated to transport and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening. We decided to include transport in these charts because the fuel that is sometimes used for transport adds to the resources used to grow food.

In the last section of the page, two charts show immaterial benefits in terms of motivations for our gardeners to work in this community garden and the impact that this work generates on their health, socialisation and more. Transport, motivations and impacts were identified on the basis of a survey amongst gardeners and volunteers conducted in 2019.

All charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in two bars the progressive consumption of water and electricity from March to October 2019 and 2020, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilogram of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption. The garden is located next to offices and the electricity meter shows the overall consumption of the garden and offices. Electricity consumption of the garden is therefore based on an estimate and includes the energy consumed by the gardeners using facilities of the offices.

FOOD

The harvest charts, rather than showing harvest per month, show the weight of the crops harvested together with the quantity of kilograms per m2 of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which in some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the quantity of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers. For Polish case studies, commuting to the garden was recorded by only one gardener/plot user, even if the garden/plot was used by other people (e.g. other family members). This chart refers to trips in 2019 and 2020.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. This chart refers to impacts and motivations recorded in 2019.

Poland - Case Study 3
TYPE:
Allotment
NAME:
TULIPAN 6

 

DESCRIPTION:
TULIPAN 6 - is in Gorzów Wielkopolski, a city with nearly 125,000 inhabitants located in the west of Poland and is an allotment plot within Family Allotment Garden "Tulipan," which is associated with Polish Allotment Gardeners Federation, branch of Gorzów Wielkopolski. The allotment garden was established in 1982 and is located in the south of the city, surrounded by agriculture areas.
Tulipan 6 is one of 255 plots included in the allotment garden. The total area of the case study plot is 408 m2. The current user has been taking care of the plot for 35 years (since 1985). The main benefit of having a plot is the opportunity to rest and recreation, but also to have healthy own fruits and vegetables. The cultivation area occupies 60% of the plot with such vegetables as butter lettuce, cucumber, radish, carrot, peas and fruits as strawberries.


DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops and the quantity of food that has been grown over two years, between March and October 2019, and March and October 2020. The last two sections of this page are dedicated to transport and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening. We decided to include transport in these charts because the fuel that is sometimes used for transport adds to the resources used to grow food.

In the last section of the page, two charts show immaterial benefits in terms of motivations for our gardeners to work in this community garden and the impact that this work generates on their health, socialisation and more. Transport, motivations and impacts were identified on the basis of a survey amongst gardeners and volunteers conducted in 2019.

All charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in two bars the progressive consumption of water and electricity from March to October 2019 and 2020, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilogram of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption. The garden is located next to offices and the electricity meter shows the overall consumption of the garden and offices. Electricity consumption of the garden is therefore based on an estimate and includes the energy consumed by the gardeners using facilities of the offices.

FOOD

The harvest charts, rather than showing harvest per month, show the weight of the crops harvested together with the quantity of kilograms per m2 of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which in some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the quantity of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers. For Polish case studies, commuting to the garden was recorded by only one gardener/plot user, even if the garden/plot was used by other people (e.g. other family members). This chart refers to trips in 2019 and 2020.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. This chart refers to impacts and motivations recorded in 2019.

Poland - Case Study 4
TYPE:
Allotment
NAME:
USTRONIE 1

 

DESCRIPTION:
USTRONIE 1 - is in Gorzów Wielkopolski, a city with nearly 125,000 inhabitants located in the west of Poland and is an allotment plot within Family Allotment Garden "Ustronie", which is associated with Polish Allotment Gardeners Federation, branch of Gorzów Wielkopolski. The allotment garden was established in 1975 and is located in the central-eastern part of the city, surrounded by railway areas and Varta river meadows.
Ustronie 1 is one of 164 plots included in the allotment garden. The total area of the case study plot is 290 m2. The current user has been taking care of the plot for more than ten years (since 2009). The main benefit of having a plot is the opportunity to rest and recreation, but also to have healthy own fruits and vegetables. The cultivation area occupies 25% of the total area of the plot with such vegetables as onion, cucumber, tomato and chives.


DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops and the quantity of food that has been grown over two years, between March and October 2019, and March and October 2020. The last two sections of this page are dedicated to transport and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening. We decided to include transport in these charts because the fuel that is sometimes used for transport adds to the resources used to grow food.

In the last section of the page, two charts show immaterial benefits in terms of motivations for our gardeners to work in this community garden and the impact that this work generates on their health, socialisation and more. Transport, motivations and impacts were identified on the basis of a survey amongst gardeners and volunteers conducted in 2019.

All charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in two bars the progressive consumption of water and electricity from March to October 2019 and 2020, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilogram of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption. The garden is located next to offices and the electricity meter shows the overall consumption of the garden and offices. Electricity consumption of the garden is therefore based on an estimate and includes the energy consumed by the gardeners using facilities of the offices.

FOOD

The harvest charts, rather than showing harvest per month, show the weight of the crops harvested together with the quantity of kilograms per m2 of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which in some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the quantity of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers. For Polish case studies, commuting to the garden was recorded by only one gardener/plot user, even if the garden/plot was used by other people (e.g. other family members). This chart refers to trips in 2019 and 2020.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. This chart refers to impacts and motivations recorded in 2019.

Poland - Case Study 5
TYPE:
Allotment
NAME:
USTRONIE 5

 

DESCRIPTION:
USTRONIE 5 - is in Gorzów Wielkopolski, a city with nearly 125,000 inhabitants located in the west of Poland and is an allotment plot within Family Allotment Garden "Ustronie", which is associated with Polish Allotment Gardeners Federation, branch of Gorzów Wielkopolski. The allotment garden was established in 1975 and is located in the central-eastern part of the city, surrounded by railway areas and Varta river meadows.
Ustronie 5 is one of 164 plots included in the allotment garden. The total area of the case study plot is 288 m2. The current users have been taking care of the plot for more than five years. The main benefit of having a plot is the opportunity to rest and recreation, but also to have healthy own fruits and vegetables. The cultivation area occupies more than a third part of the plot with such vegetables as tomato, cucumber onion and others. They share the surpluses with the family.


DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops and the quantity of food that has been grown over two years, between March and October 2019, and March and October 2020. The last two sections of this page are dedicated to transport and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening. We decided to include transport in these charts because the fuel that is sometimes used for transport adds to the resources used to grow food.

In the last section of the page, two charts show immaterial benefits in terms of motivations for our gardeners to work in this community garden and the impact that this work generates on their health, socialisation and more. Transport, motivations and impacts were identified on the basis of a survey amongst gardeners and volunteers conducted in 2019.

All charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in two bars the progressive consumption of water and electricity from March to October 2019 and 2020, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilogram of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption. The garden is located next to offices and the electricity meter shows the overall consumption of the garden and offices. Electricity consumption of the garden is therefore based on an estimate and includes the energy consumed by the gardeners using facilities of the offices.

FOOD

The harvest charts, rather than showing harvest per month, show the weight of the crops harvested together with the quantity of kilograms per m2 of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which in some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the quantity of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers. For Polish case studies, commuting to the garden was recorded by only one gardener/plot user, even if the garden/plot was used by other people (e.g. other family members). This chart refers to trips in 2019 and 2020.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. This chart refers to impacts and motivations recorded in 2019.

Poland - Case Study 6
TYPE:
Allotment
NAME:
MALWA 1

 

DESCRIPTION:
MALWA 1 - is in Gorzów Wielkopolski, a city with nearly 125,000 inhabitants located in the west of Poland and is an allotment plot within Family Allotment Garden "Malwa", which is associated with Polish Allotment Gardeners Federation, branch of Gorzów Wielkopolski. The allotment garden was established in 1977 and is located in the south of the city, surrounded by agriculture areas.
Malwa 1 is a one of 519 plots included in the allotment garden. Total area of the case study plot is 350 m2. The current user has been taking care of the plot for 33 years (since 1987). The main benefit of having a plot is the opportunity to rest and recreation, but also to have healthy own fruits and vegetables. The cultivation area occupies 45% of the total area of the plot with such vegetables as parsley, carrot, beetroot, celeriac, leek, tomato and also strawberries.


DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops and the quantity of food that has been grown over two years, between March and October 2019, and March and October 2020. The last two sections of this page are dedicated to transport and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening. We decided to include transport in these charts because the fuel that is sometimes used for transport adds to the resources used to grow food.

In the last section of the page, two charts show immaterial benefits in terms of motivations for our gardeners to work in this community garden and the impact that this work generates on their health, socialisation and more. Transport, motivations and impacts were identified on the basis of a survey amongst gardeners and volunteers conducted in 2019.

All charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in two bars the progressive consumption of water and electricity from March to October 2019 and 2020, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilogram of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption. The garden is located next to offices and the electricity meter shows the overall consumption of the garden and offices. Electricity consumption of the garden is therefore based on an estimate and includes the energy consumed by the gardeners using facilities of the offices.

FOOD

The harvest charts, rather than showing harvest per month, show the weight of the crops harvested together with the quantity of kilograms per m2 of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which in some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the quantity of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers. For Polish case studies, commuting to the garden was recorded by only one gardener/plot user, even if the garden/plot was used by other people (e.g. other family members). This chart refers to trips in 2019 and 2020.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. This chart refers to impacts and motivations recorded in 2019.

Poland - Case Study 7
TYPE:
Allotment
NAME:
NOWALIJKA 1

 

DESCRIPTION:
NOWALIJKA 1 - is in Gorzów Wielkopolski, a city with nearly 125,000 inhabitants located in the west of Poland and is an allotment plot within Family Allotment Garden "Nowalijka", which is associated with Polish Allotment Gardeners Federation, branch of Gorzów Wielkopolski. The allotment garden was established in 1984 and is located in the north of the city, surrounded by agriculture, residential and industrial areas.
Nowalijka 1 is one of 142 plots included in the allotment garden. The total area of the case study plot is 295 m2. The current user has been taking care of the plot for 21 years (since 1999). The main benefit of having a plot is the opportunity to rest and recreation, but also to have healthy own fruits and vegetables. Mainly there are grown: carrot, tomato, cucumber, zucchini, leek, beetroot and pepper.


DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops and the quantity of food that has been grown over two years, between March and October 2019, and March and October 2020. The last two sections of this page are dedicated to transport and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening. We decided to include transport in these charts because the fuel that is sometimes used for transport adds to the resources used to grow food.

In the last section of the page, two charts show immaterial benefits in terms of motivations for our gardeners to work in this community garden and the impact that this work generates on their health, socialisation and more. Transport, motivations and impacts were identified on the basis of a survey amongst gardeners and volunteers conducted in 2019.

All charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in two bars the progressive consumption of water and electricity from March to October 2019 and 2020, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilogram of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption. The garden is located next to offices and the electricity meter shows the overall consumption of the garden and offices. Electricity consumption of the garden is therefore based on an estimate and includes the energy consumed by the gardeners using facilities of the offices.

FOOD

The harvest charts, rather than showing harvest per month, show the weight of the crops harvested together with the quantity of kilograms per m2 of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which in some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the quantity of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers. For Polish case studies, commuting to the garden was recorded by only one gardener/plot user, even if the garden/plot was used by other people (e.g. other family members). This chart refers to trips in 2019 and 2020.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. This chart refers to impacts and motivations recorded in 2019.

Poland - Case Study 8
TYPE:
Allotment
NAME:
NOWALIJKA 4

 

DESCRIPTION:
NOWALIJKA 4 - is in Gorzów Wielkopolski, city with nearly 125,000 inhabitants located in the west of Poland and is an allotment plot within Family Allotment Garden "Nowalijka", which is associated with Polish Allotment Gardeners Federation, branch of Gorzów Wielkopolski. The allotment garden was established in 1984 and is located in the north of the city, surrounded by agriculture, residential and industrial areas.
Nowalijka 4 is one of 142 plots included in the allotment garden. The total area of the case study plot is 430 m2. The current user has been taking care of the plot for 32 years (sicne 1988). The main benefit of having a plot is the opportunity to rest and recreation, but also to have healthy own fruits and vegetables. Mainly there are grown: carrot, tomato and cucumber.


DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops and the quantity of food that has been grown over two years, between March and October 2019, and March and October 2020. The last two sections of this page are dedicated to transport and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening. We decided to include transport in these charts because the fuel that is sometimes used for transport adds to the resources used to grow food.

In the last section of the page, two charts show immaterial benefits in terms of motivations for our gardeners to work in this community garden and the impact that this work generates on their health, socialisation and more. Transport, motivations and impacts were identified on the basis of a survey amongst gardeners and volunteers conducted in 2019.

All charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in two bars the progressive consumption of water and electricity from March to October 2019 and 2020, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilogram of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption. The garden is located next to offices and the electricity meter shows the overall consumption of the garden and offices. Electricity consumption of the garden is therefore based on an estimate and includes the energy consumed by the gardeners using facilities of the offices.

FOOD

The harvest charts, rather than showing harvest per month, show the weight of the crops harvested together with the quantity of kilograms per m2 of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which in some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the quantity of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers. For Polish case studies, commuting to the garden was recorded by only one gardener/plot user, even if the garden/plot was used by other people (e.g. other family members). This chart refers to trips in 2019 and 2020.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. This chart refers to impacts and motivations recorded in 2019.

Poland - Case Study 9
TYPE:
Allotment
NAME:
METALOWIEC 4

 

DESCRIPTION:
METALOWIEC 4 - is in Gorzów Wielkopolski, a city with nearly 125,000 inhabitants located in the west of Poland and is an allotment plot within Family Allotment Garden "Metalowiec", which is associated with Polish Allotment Gardeners Federation, branch of Gorzów Wielkopolski. The allotment garden was established in 1959 and is located in the eastern-south part of of the city, surrounded by residential and agriculture areas.
Metalowiec 4 is one of 352 plots included in the allotment garden. Total area of the case study plot is 277 m2. The current user has been taking care of the plot for 2 years (sine 2018). The main benefit of having a plot is the opportunity to rest and recreation, but also to have healthy own fruits and vegetables. Mainly there are grown: carrot, tomato, parsley, butter lettuce, radish and basil.


DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops and the quantity of food that has been grown over two years, between March and October 2019, and March and October 2020. The last two sections of this page are dedicated to transport and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening. We decided to include transport in these charts because the fuel that is sometimes used for transport adds to the resources used to grow food.

In the last section of the page, two charts show immaterial benefits in terms of motivations for our gardeners to work in this community garden and the impact that this work generates on their health, socialisation and more. Transport, motivations and impacts were identified on the basis of a survey amongst gardeners and volunteers conducted in 2019.

All charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in two bars the progressive consumption of water and electricity from March to October 2019 and 2020, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilogram of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption. The garden is located next to offices and the electricity meter shows the overall consumption of the garden and offices. Electricity consumption of the garden is therefore based on an estimate and includes the energy consumed by the gardeners using facilities of the offices.

FOOD

The harvest charts, rather than showing harvest per month, show the weight of the crops harvested together with the quantity of kilograms per m2 of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which in some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the quantity of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers. For Polish case studies, commuting to the garden was recorded by only one gardener/plot user, even if the garden/plot was used by other people (e.g. other family members). This chart refers to trips in 2019 and 2020.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. This chart refers to impacts and motivations recorded in 2019.

Poland - Case Study 10
TYPE:
Allotment
NAME:
METALOWIEC 5

 

DESCRIPTION:
METALOWIEC 5 - is in Gorzów Wielkopolski, a city with nearly 125,000 inhabitants located in the west of Poland and is an allotment plot within Family Allotment Garden "Metalowiec", which is associated with Polish Allotment Gardeners Federation, branch of Gorzów Wielkopolski. The allotment garden was established in 1959 and is located in the eastern-south part of the city, surrounded by residential and agriculture areas.
Metalowiec 5 is one of 352 plots included in the allotment garden. The total area of the case study plot is 291 m2. The current user has been taking care of the plot for 2 years (since 2018). The main benefit of having a plot is the opportunity to rest and recreation, but also to have healthy own fruits and vegetables. Mainly there are grown: parsley, garlic, cauliflower, tomato, onion, cucumber, radish, beetroot, carrot, kohlrabi, lettuce, pepper, strawberries and raspberries.


DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops and the quantity of food that has been grown over two years, between March and October 2019, and March and October 2020. The last two sections of this page are dedicated to transport and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening. We decided to include transport in these charts because the fuel that is sometimes used for transport adds to the resources used to grow food.

In the last section of the page, two charts show immaterial benefits in terms of motivations for our gardeners to work in this community garden and the impact that this work generates on their health, socialisation and more. Transport, motivations and impacts were identified on the basis of a survey amongst gardeners and volunteers conducted in 2019.

All charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in two bars the progressive consumption of water and electricity from March to October 2019 and 2020, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilogram of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption. The garden is located next to offices and the electricity meter shows the overall consumption of the garden and offices. Electricity consumption of the garden is therefore based on an estimate and includes the energy consumed by the gardeners using facilities of the offices.

FOOD

The harvest charts, rather than showing harvest per month, show the weight of the crops harvested together with the quantity of kilograms per m2 of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which in some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the quantity of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers. For Polish case studies, commuting to the garden was recorded by only one gardener/plot user, even if the garden/plot was used by other people (e.g. other family members). This chart refers to trips in 2019 and 2020.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. This chart refers to impacts and motivations recorded in 2019.

Poland - Case Study 11
TYPE:
Allotment
NAME:
GORZOW 2

 

DESCRIPTION:
GORZOW 2 is a small gardening farm in the northern part of Gorzow Wielkopolski. The farm has been operating since 1973. The main purpose of the farm is to provide fresh vegetables and fruits to the market. Initially, it was the production of vegetables as well as strawberries and raspberries in the ground. From 1975, vegetables have also been grown in cold and heated foil tunnels. There are currently three tunnels on the farm.
The farm produces vegetables such as carrots, celery, leeks, parsley, green beans, cucumbers, zucchini, pumpkins, rhubarb, tomatoes, lettuce, cabbage, also chives, dill, lovage. Crops from the farm are sold locally nearby the farm in Gorzow Wielkopolski at a small market, where the farm owner has a stall.


DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops and the quantity of food that has been grown over two years, between March and October 2019, and March and October 2020. The last two sections of this page are dedicated to transport and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening. We decided to include transport in these charts because the fuel that is sometimes used for transport adds to the resources used to grow food.

In the last section of the page, two charts show immaterial benefits in terms of motivations for our gardeners to work in this community garden and the impact that this work generates on their health, socialisation and more. Transport, motivations and impacts were identified on the basis of a survey amongst gardeners and volunteers conducted in 2019.

All charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in two bars the progressive consumption of water and electricity from March to October 2019 and 2020, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilogram of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption. The garden is located next to offices and the electricity meter shows the overall consumption of the garden and offices. Electricity consumption of the garden is therefore based on an estimate and includes the energy consumed by the gardeners using facilities of the offices.

FOOD

The harvest charts, rather than showing harvest per month, show the weight of the crops harvested together with the quantity of kilograms per m2 of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which in some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the quantity of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers. For Polish case studies, commuting to the garden was recorded by only one gardener/plot user, even if the garden/plot was used by other people (e.g. other family members). This chart refers to trips in 2019 and 2020.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. This chart refers to impacts and motivations recorded in 2019.

Poland - Case Study 12

TYPE:
Allotment
NAME:
GORZOW 3

 

DESCRIPTION:
GORZOW 3 is a home garden located in the southern part of Gorzow Wielkopolski. The garden was established in 2005 to provide a family of four with vegetables and fruits. In the area of 880 m2 38 fruit trees of such species as apple, pear, cherry, peach, plum, walnut and hazelnut were planted. The area of ​​220 m2 is occupied by strawberries and fruit bushes like raspberries, currants (black and red), Kamchatka berries, blueberries, gooseberries, chokeberries, blackberries and grapevines.
Vegetable cultivation is carried out on the area of 200 m2 (including a polytunnel of 13.5 m2 which peppers and tomatoes). The garden owner grows many varieties of vegetables such as carrot, parsley, beetroot, potatoes, leek, celeriac, onion, cabbage, radish, butter lettuce, dill, cucumbers, watermelons, green beans, peas and horseradish.
The majority of harvested vegetables and fruits are intended for the garden owner's family (consumed both fresh and processed, i.e. jams, juices, salads, etc.). Surpluses are transferred to family members and neighbours.


DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops and the quantity of food that has been grown over two years, between March and October 2019, and March and October 2020. The last two sections of this page are dedicated to transport and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening. We decided to include transport in these charts because the fuel that is sometimes used for transport adds to the resources used to grow food.

In the last section of the page, two charts show immaterial benefits in terms of motivations for our gardeners to work in this community garden and the impact that this work generates on their health, socialisation and more. Transport, motivations and impacts were identified on the basis of a survey amongst gardeners and volunteers conducted in 2019.

All charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in two bars the progressive consumption of water and electricity from March to October 2019 and 2020, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilogram of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption. The garden is located next to offices and the electricity meter shows the overall consumption of the garden and offices. Electricity consumption of the garden is therefore based on an estimate and includes the energy consumed by the gardeners using facilities of the offices.

FOOD

The harvest charts, rather than showing harvest per month, show the weight of the crops harvested together with the quantity of kilograms per m2 of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which in some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the quantity of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers. For Polish case studies, commuting to the garden was recorded by only one gardener/plot user, even if the garden/plot was used by other people (e.g. other family members). This chart refers to trips in 2019 and 2020.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. This chart refers to impacts and motivations recorded in 2019.

Poland - Case Study 13
TYPE:
Allotment
NAME:
JEDNOŚĆ 1

 

DESCRIPTION:
JEDNOŚĆ 1 - is in Gorzów Wielkopolski, a city with nearly 125,000 inhabitants located in the west of Poland and is an allotment plot within Family Allotment Garden "Jedność", which is associated with Polish Allotment Gardeners Federation, branch of Gorzów Wielkopolski. The allotment garden was established in 1971 and is located in the central part of the city, surrounded by residential areas.
Jedność 1 is one of 118 plots included in the allotment garden. The total area of the case study plot is 405 m2. The current user has been taking care of the plot for 16 years (since 2004). The main benefit of having a plot is the opportunity to rest and recreation, but also to have healthy own fruits and vegetables. Mainly there are grown: tomato, carrot and lettuce.


DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops and the quantity of food that has been grown over two years, between March and October 2019, and March and October 2020. The last two sections of this page are dedicated to transport and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening. We decided to include transport in these charts because the fuel that is sometimes used for transport adds to the resources used to grow food.

In the last section of the page, two charts show immaterial benefits in terms of motivations for our gardeners to work in this community garden and the impact that this work generates on their health, socialisation and more. Transport, motivations and impacts were identified on the basis of a survey amongst gardeners and volunteers conducted in 2019.

All charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in two bars the progressive consumption of water and electricity from March to October 2019 and 2020, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilogram of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption. The garden is located next to offices and the electricity meter shows the overall consumption of the garden and offices. Electricity consumption of the garden is therefore based on an estimate and includes the energy consumed by the gardeners using facilities of the offices.

FOOD

The harvest charts, rather than showing harvest per month, show the weight of the crops harvested together with the quantity of kilograms per m2 of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which in some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the quantity of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers. For Polish case studies, commuting to the garden was recorded by only one gardener/plot user, even if the garden/plot was used by other people (e.g. other family members). This chart refers to trips in 2019 and 2020.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. This chart refers to impacts and motivations recorded in 2019.

Poland - Case Study 14
TYPE:
Allotment
NAME:
JEDNOŚĆ 3

 

DESCRIPTION:
JEDNOŚĆ 3 - is in Gorzów Wielkopolski, a city with nearly 125,000 inhabitants located in the west of Poland and is an allotment plot within Family Allotment Garden "Jedność", which is associated with Polish Allotment Gardeners Federation, branch of Gorzów Wielkopolski. The allotment garden was established in 1971 and is located in the central part of the city, surrounded by residential areas.
Jedność 3 is one of 118 plots included in the allotment garden. The total area of the case study plot is 396 m2. The current user has been taking care of the plot for 10 years (since 2010). The main benefit of having a plot is the opportunity to rest and recreation, but also to have healthy own fruits and vegetables. Mainly there are grown: cucumber, beetroot, lettuce and leek.


DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops and the quantity of food that has been grown over two years, between March and October 2019, and March and October 2020. The last two sections of this page are dedicated to transport and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening. We decided to include transport in these charts because the fuel that is sometimes used for transport adds to the resources used to grow food.

In the last section of the page, two charts show immaterial benefits in terms of motivations for our gardeners to work in this community garden and the impact that this work generates on their health, socialisation and more. Transport, motivations and impacts were identified on the basis of a survey amongst gardeners and volunteers conducted in 2019.

All charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in two bars the progressive consumption of water and electricity from March to October 2019 and 2020, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilogram of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption. The garden is located next to offices and the electricity meter shows the overall consumption of the garden and offices. Electricity consumption of the garden is therefore based on an estimate and includes the energy consumed by the gardeners using facilities of the offices.

FOOD

The harvest charts, rather than showing harvest per month, show the weight of the crops harvested together with the quantity of kilograms per m2 of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which in some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the quantity of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers. For Polish case studies, commuting to the garden was recorded by only one gardener/plot user, even if the garden/plot was used by other people (e.g. other family members). This chart refers to trips in 2019 and 2020.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. This chart refers to impacts and motivations recorded in 2019.

UK - Case Study 1
TYPE:
Community Garden
NAME OF THE ALLOTMENT:
The Castle Community Garden
ADDRESS:
Green Lanes, Stoke Newington, London N4 2HA
SURFACE AREA:
750 m2

 

DESCRIPTION:
The Castle Garden was established in 2009. It is located in the grounds of a building used as an indoor climbing centre with a café and other facilities. The centre is run and managed sustainably, with the garden being used as a productive and educational area, a space for wildlife and a relaxing spot for the Castle members and staff. The food produced is used in the cafeteria use of the space around the Castle building is used to grow food for the café, provide. The castle garden is designed using permaculture principles and recycled materials with the help of strong and willing volunteers. Today the result is a one acre, vibrant, biodiverse space teeming with wildlife and an abundant variety of fruit, vegetables and herbs.


DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops, the quantity of food that has been grown and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening, between March and October 2019. Charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in a bar the progressive consumption of water and electricity across some months of the year, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilogram of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption. The garden is located next to offices and the electricity meter shows the overall consumption of the garden and offices. Electricity consumption of the garden is therefore based on an estimate and includes the energy consumed by the gardeners using facilities of the offices.

FOOD

The harvest chart, rather than showing harvest per month, shows the weight of the crops that were picked together with the quantity of kilograms per meter squared of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which is some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the quantity of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing.

UK - Case Study 2
TYPE:
Community Garden
NAME OF THE ALLOTMENT:
Cranbrook Community Garden
ADDRESS:
Mace St, Bethnal Green, London E2 0RB
SURFACE AREA:
320 m2

 

DESCRIPTION:
This community garden is located in the centre of a large social housing complex, the Cranbrook Estate in Globe Town, London. It was previously occupied by a playground that had  fallen into disrepair. It has now become a place for gathering and growing food in an area that lacks social services and alternative opportunities to get together. The garden also helps recycling food waste, which is not collected by the local council. The food grown is given to anyone who wants it and cash donations are used to run the garden. Volunteering is key to the running of the garden – people from outside the estate come on Saturdays to help.


DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops and the quantity of food that has been grown over two years, between March and October 2019, and March and October 2020. The last two sections of this page are dedicated to transport and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening. We decided to include transport in these charts because the fuel that is sometimes used for transport adds to the resources used to grow food.

In the last section of the page, two charts show immaterial benefits in terms of motivations for our gardeners to work in this community garden and the impact that this work generates on their health, socialisation and more. Transport, motivations and impacts were identified on the basis of a survey amongst gardeners and volunteers conducted in 2019.

All charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in two bars the progressive consumption of water and electricity from March to October 2019 and 2020, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilogram of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption. The garden is located next to offices and the electricity meter shows the overall consumption of the garden and offices. Electricity consumption of the garden is therefore based on an estimate and includes the energy consumed by the gardeners using facilities of the offices.

FOOD

The harvest charts, rather than showing harvest per month, show the weight of the crops harvested together with the quantity of kilograms per m2 of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which is some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the number of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers. This chart refers to trips in 2019.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. This chart refers to impacts and motivations recorded in 2019.

UK - Case Study 3
TYPE:
Community Garden
NAME OF THE ALLOTMENT:
Mudlarks Community Garden
ADDRESS:
Cromwell Road Allotments Hertford
SURFACE AREA:
1700 m2

 

DESCRIPTION:
Mudlarks is a Hertford based charity supporting adults with learning disabilities and mental health issues. It has established a garden in which these adults are given the opportunity to gain gardening work experience and extend their skills. A team of gardeners, staff and volunteers maintain the Mudlarks Garden and supports the participants to this project. Mudlarks has developed a learning programme that provides horticultural training and leads to work opportunities. It helps each gardener build self-confidence and develop the discipline to work towards gaining employment. The food produced in the garden is largely used in the popular Mudlarks Café, located in the city centre. Income generated from the café is entirely used to support the charity’s activities.


DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops and the quantity of food that has been grown over two years, between March and October 2019, and March and October 2020. The last two sections of this page are dedicated to transport and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening. We decided to include transport in these charts because the fuel that is sometimes used for transport adds to the resources used to grow food.

In the last section of the page, two charts show immaterial benefits in terms of motivations for our gardeners to work in this community garden and the impact that this work generates on their health, socialisation and more. Transport, motivations and impacts were identified on the basis of a survey amongst gardeners and volunteers conducted in 2019.

All charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises the progressive consumption of water from March to October 2019 and 2020, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilogram of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis shows the overall consumption.

Gardeners use some electricity for their activities but this is generated by photo-voltaic panels installed on the roof of the community hub. Therefore there is no real electricity consumption.

FOOD

The harvest charts, rather than showing harvest per month, show the weight of the crops harvested together with the quantity of kilograms per m2 of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which is some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the number of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers. This chart refers to trips in 2019.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. This chart refers to impacts and motivations recorded in 2019.

UK - Case Study 4
TYPE:
Community Garden
NAME OF THE ALLOTMENT:
Calthorpe Community Garden
ADDRESS:
258-274 Grays Inn Rd, London WC1X 8LH
SURFACE AREA:
350 m2

 

DESCRIPTION:
Calthorpe community garden is located in the centre of London and was established with the mission of improving ‘the physical and emotional well-being of those who live, work or study in the surrounding areas’. Calthorpe organises a multitude of activities, including sport areas and community rooms for local groups, a horticultural training programme for people with learning disabilities and mental health issues, supervised activities for children aged 0-14 and their families and a closed-loop food growing permanent experiment incorporating food production, its consumption in the café and an anaerobic digester producing biogas and fertiliser. The community garden is only a small area of the entire community space although very productive and lively.


DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops and the quantity of food that has been grown over two years, between March and October 2019, and March and October 2020. The last two sections of this page are dedicated to transport and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening. We decided to include transport in these charts because the fuel that is sometimes used for transport adds to the resources used to grow food.

In the last section of the page, two charts show immaterial benefits in terms of motivations for our gardeners to work in this community garden and the impact that this work generates on their health, socialisation and more. Transport, motivations and impacts were identified on the basis of a survey amongst gardeners and volunteers conducted in 2019.

All charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in two bars the progressive consumption of water and electricity from March to October 2019 and 2020, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilogram of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption. The garden is located next to offices and the electricity meter shows the overall consumption of the garden and offices. Electricity consumption of the garden is therefore based on an estimate and includes the energy consumed by the gardeners using facilities of the offices.

FOOD

The harvest charts, rather than showing harvest per month, show the weight of the crops harvested together with the quantity of kilograms per m2 of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which is some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the number of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers. This chart refers to trips in 2019.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. This chart refers to impacts and motivations recorded in 2019.

UK - Case Study 5
TYPE:
Community Garden
NAME OF THE ALLOTMENT:
Slade Community Garden
ADDRESS:
Lorn Road, London SW9 0AB
SURFACE AREA:
280 m2

 

DESCRIPTION:
This community garden is managed by Urban Growth, a social enterprise with the aim of improving Londoners' well-being with the help of biodiverse spaces. It is located in an adventure playground which needs upgrading. The local community asked Urban Growth to set up a growing space as part of the playground, which could attract volunteers and be used as an educational space for school children. The garden was opened in April 2019. Local people helped construct raised beds and the poly-tunnel. Children and families using the playground will be able to move seamlessly from the amazing play structures into the food & wildlife areas.


DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops and the quantity of food that has been grown over two years, between March and October 2019, and March and October 2020. The last two sections of this page are dedicated to transport and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening. We decided to include transport in these charts because the fuel that is sometimes used for transport adds to the resources used to grow food.

In the last section of the page, two charts show immaterial benefits in terms of motivations for our gardeners to work in this community garden and the impact that this work generates on their health, socialisation and more. Transport, motivations and impacts were identified on the basis of a survey amongst gardeners and volunteers conducted in 2019.

All charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in two bars the progressive consumption of water and electricity from March to October 2019 and 2020, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilogram of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption. The garden is located next to offices and the electricity meter shows the overall consumption of the garden and offices. Electricity consumption of the garden is therefore based on an estimate and includes the energy consumed by the gardeners using facilities of the offices.

FOOD

The harvest charts, rather than showing harvest per month, show the weight of the crops harvested together with the quantity of kilograms per m2 of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which is some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the number of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers. This chart refers to trips in 2019.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. This chart refers to impacts and motivations recorded in 2019.

UK - Case Study 6
TYPE:
Community Garden
NAME OF THE ALLOTMENT:
The Skip Garden
ADDRESS:
1 Tapper Walk, Kings Cross, London N1C 4AQ
SURFACE AREA:
640 - 120

 

DESCRIPTION:
For 10 years (2009 to 2019), the Skip Garden has been relocated several times within the King's Cross development area, one of the most ambitious regeneration areas in London. Food is grown in skips, which are located on a plot until construction starts, and subsequently relocated on another empty plot on a temporary basis. Other sheds, poly-tunnels and raised beds have been built, dismantled and rebuilt by young people and local business volunteers, together creating a new and sustainable community. It was a unique space where apple trees, pumpkins and beans grow out of skips, and tomatoes, ginger and chillies grow under poly-tunnels made with water pipes and polythene. Most of the food produced is used in the café, which has become a very popular spot. Revenues from the café help sustain financially the project. The Skip Garden is now relocating next to the British Library.
The Skip Garden is managed by Global Generation, a charity supporting the London boroughs of Camden, Islington and Southwark in creating healthy, integrated and environmentally responsible communities.


DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops, the quantity of food that has been grown and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening, between March and October 2019. Charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in a bar the progressive consumption of water across some months of the year, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilogram of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption. In this case study, the food garden is part of a bigger project which includes a café and laboratories. However, the electricity chart is not included because the food garden does not use electricity.

FOOD

The harvest chart, rather than showing harvest per month, shows the weight of the crops that were picked together with the quantity of kilograms per meter squared of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which is some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the quantity of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers. In this case study, all gardeners live in the area and walk to the site.

UK - Case Study 7
TYPE:
Community Garden
NAME OF THE ALLOTMENT:
Regent's Park Allotment Garden
ADDRESS:
Inner Circle, London NW1 4NP
SURFACE AREA:
460m2

 

DESCRIPTION:
The Regent's Park Allotment Garden is located in one of the most beautiful parks in London and it is maintained by a team of dedicated volunteers. Its purpose is to inspire and train people to grow food, while providing advice on organic food growing techniques. The team organises open days, training events and educational sessions for local schools. Currently, it is run as a partnership between The Royal Parks (the organisation managing Regent’s Park), Capital Growth (an independent organisation promoting sustainable food and agriculture) and Capel Manor College (an agronomy school).


DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops, the quantity of food that has been grown and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening, between March and October 2019. Charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in a bar the progressive consumption of water and electricity across some months of the year, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilogram of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption. The garden is located next to offices and the electricity meter shows the overall consumption of the garden and offices. Electricity consumption of the garden is therefore based on an estimate and includes the energy consumed by the gardeners using facilities of the offices.

FOOD

The harvest chart, rather than showing harvest per month, shows the weight of the crops that were picked together with the quantity of kilograms per meter squared of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which is some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the quantity of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing.

UK - Case Study 8
NAME OF THE ALLOTMENT:
William Hobbayne Community Gardens
ADDRESS:
St Margaret's Rd, Hanwell, London W7 2HF
SURFACE AREA:
150m2

 

DESCRIPTION:
The William Hobbayne Community Gardens in Hanwell, West London is the result of transforming derelict land beside the Grand Union Canal into 55 mini growing spaces (3m X 3m) for local people to grow their own fruit and vegetables and as a community space. Gardeners began their work on individual plots in April 2012. Gardeners acquire horticulture skills and a community ethos in this garden. Weekly events are scheduled to work on communal areas and strengthen community bonds. Gardeners who demonstrate that they are capable of looking after their plot have the opportunity to lease bigger plots in the adjacent William Hobbayne Allotment site.


DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops, the quantity of food that has been grown and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening, between March and October 2019. Charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in a bar the progressive consumption of water and electricity across some months of the year, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilogram of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption. The electricity chart shows only the fuel for gardening tools. The site is not connected to the electrical grid.

FOOD

The harvest chart, rather than showing harvest per month, shows the weight of the crops that were picked together with the quantity of kilograms per meter squared of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which is some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the quantity of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers. In this case study, all gardeners live in the area and walk to the site.

UK - Case Study 9
TYPE:
Community Farm
NAME OF THE ALLOTMENT:
Sutton Community Farm
ADDRESS:
40a Telegraph Track, Wallington SM6 0SH
SURFACE AREA:
28,750

 

DESCRIPTION:
Sutton Community Farm is a 7 acre community-owned farm, employing a small team that is supported by a large network of volunteers. It started in 2010 as a result of a consultation process with local residents and their need of increased access to fresh, healthy, sustainable food as well as the provision of a shared space for people to cultivate skills, get exercise and make new friends. A suitable piece of unoccupied land was found with the help of a local charity and people were invited to help. The project grew slowly as volunteers developed their skills, gathered equipment, raised funds and understood the land and their place in the community. To date, Sutton Community Farm has  welcomed more than 3,000 volunteers and organised many events and volunteering days. They have also established a training programme for volunteers in order to provide them with farming knowledge and skills.


DASHBOARD

The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops and the quantity of food that has been grown over two years, between March and October 2019, and March and October 2020. The last two sections of this page are dedicated to transport and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening. We decided to include transport in these charts because the fuel that is sometimes used for transport adds to the resources used to grow food.

In the last section of the page, two charts show immaterial benefits in terms of motivations for our gardeners to work in this community garden and the impact that this work generates on their health, socialisation and more. Transport, motivations and impacts were identified on the basis of a survey amongst gardeners and volunteers conducted in 2019.

All charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication.

WATER

The water chart visualises in two bars the progressive consumption of water and electricity from March to October 2019 and 2020, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilogram of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption. The garden is located next to offices and the electricity meter shows the overall consumption of the garden and offices. Electricity consumption of the garden is therefore based on an estimate and includes the energy consumed by the gardeners using facilities of the offices.

FOOD

The harvest charts, rather than showing harvest per month, show the weight of the crops harvested together with the quantity of kilograms per m2 of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which is some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the number of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers. This chart refers to trips in 2019.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. This chart refers to impacts and motivations recorded in 2019.

USA - Case Study 1
TYPE:
Community Farm
NAME:
Wagner Houses Farm
ADDRESS:
Wagner Houses, 122nd Street, East Harlem, Manhattan
SIZE:
1349 m2

 

DESCRIPTION:
Wagner Houses Farm is a 1/3-acre (1349 m2) farm built in 2016 on the Wagner Houses campus, a New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) development in East Harlem. The farm was built and is operated by young public housing residents (ages 18-24) who are part of a federal public service program called AmeriCorps Green City Force that provides professional development and skill-building opportunities with an emphasis on sustainability and community cohesion; the farm is also partnered with community-based organization Harlem Grown, a non-profit focused on nutritional literacy, food justice, and healthy food access for Harlem youth, which assists in farm management and programming. The farm aims to achieve four goals: youth development and workforce training, landscape transformation, community engagement, and improved nutrition and dietary behaviors among residents. The farm hosts farm stands twice a week, giving the produce harvested at the farm to public housing residents for free in exchange for their food scraps for composting or volunteer time at the farm. The farm also hosts cooking demonstrations and other nutritional programming, farm-based learning for school children, and community events like harvest festivals and volunteer days. The farm uses raised beds to grow crops and adheres to environmentally sustainable farming practices, using strategies like companion planting and integrated pest management. The organization managing the community farm is committed to achieving a closed-loop metabolism, aiming to ultimately integrate captured rainwater and locally produced compost in the operation of the farm. While the farm site itself does not have the infrastructure for compost production, in order to keep food scrap drop-off accessible to residents, they have a partnership with the New York Department of Sanitation (DSNY) who picks up and processes food scraps.


DASHBOARD

'The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops, the quantity of food that has been grown and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening, between March 2019 and the end of November 2020. Charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication'.

WATER

The water chart visualises in a bar the progressive consumption of water and electricity across some months of the year, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilogram of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption. The total water consumption for this case study was calculated as an estimate based on water flow rate and time per week spent watering; the consumption is reported as a total over the whole season.

FOOD

The harvest chart, rather than showing harvest per month, shows the weight of the crops that were picked together with the quantity of kilograms per meter squared of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which in some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the quantity of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. The charts refer to answers given by all US case study participants and not to one single allotment plot holder.

USA - Case Study 2
TYPE:
Community Farm
NAME:
Forest Houses Farm
ADDRESS:
Forest Houses, 730 East 165th Street, Morrisania, Bronx
SIZE:
5396 m2

 

DESCRIPTION:
Forest Houses Farm is a 1 1/3-acre (5396 m2) farm built in 2017 on the Forest Houses campus, a NYCHA development in the Morrisania neighborhood of the Bronx. The farm was built and is operated by young public housing residents (ages 18-24) who are part of a federal public service program called AmeriCorps Green City Force that provides professional development and skill-building opportunities with an emphasis on sustainability and community cohesion; the farm is also partnered with community-based organization La Finca del Sur, an urban farming cooperative led by Latina and Black women in the South Bronx. The farm aims to achieve four goals: youth development and workforce training, landscape transformation, community engagement, and improved nutrition and dietary behaviors among residents. The farm hosts farm stands twice a week, giving the produce harvested at the farm to public housing residents for free in exchange for their kitchen scraps for composting or volunteer time at the farm. The youth also host cooking demonstrations and other nutritional programming, farm-based learning for school children, and community events like harvest festivals and volunteer days. The farm uses raised beds to grow crops and adheres to environmentally sustainable farming practices, using strategies like companion planting and integrated pest management. The organization managing the community farm is committed to achieving a closed-loop metabolism, aiming to ultimately integrate captured rainwater and compost produced on-site in the operation of the farm.


DASHBOARD

‘The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops, the quantity of food that has been grown and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening, between March 2019 and the end of November 2020. Charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication’.

WATER

The water chart visualises in a bar the progressive consumption of water and electricity across some months of the year, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilogram of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption. The total water consumption for this case study was calculated as an estimate based on water flow rate and time per week spent watering; the consumption is reported as a total over the whole season.

FOOD

The harvest chart, rather than showing harvest per month, shows the weight of the crops that were picked together with the quantity of kilograms per meter squared of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which in some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the quantity of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

‘Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. The charts refer to answers given by all US case study participants and not to one single allotment plot holder'.

USA - Case Study 3
TYPE:
Community Farm
NAME:
Red Hook Houses Farm
ADDRESS:
Red Hook Houses West, 6 Wolcott Street, Red Hook, Brooklyn
SIZE:
4046 m2

 

DESCRIPTION:
The Red Hook Houses Farm is a 1 acre (4046 m2) farm built in 2013 on the Red Hook West Houses campus, a NYCHA development in Red Hook, Brooklyn. The farm was built and is operated by young public housing residents (ages 18-24) who are part of a federal public service program called AmeriCorps Green City Force that provides professional development and skill-building opportunities with an emphasis on sustainability and community cohesion; the farm is partnered with community-based organization the Red Hook Initiative (formerly Added Value) who also run a companion farm in the neighborhood. The farm aims to achieve four goals: youth development and workforce training, landscape transformation, community engagement, and improved nutrition and dietary behaviors among residents. The farm hosts farm stands once a week, giving the produce harvested at the farm to public housing residents for free in exchange for their kitchen scraps for composting or volunteer time at the farm. The youth also host cooking demonstrations and other nutritional programming, farm-based learning for school children, and community events like harvest festivals and volunteer days. The farm uses raised beds to grow crops and adheres to environmentally sustainable farming practices, using strategies like companion planting and integrated pest management. The organization managing the community farm is committed to achieving a closed-loop metabolism, aiming to ultimately integrate captured rainwater and compost produced on-site in the operation of the farm.
Beginning in 2020, the Red Hook Houses Farm transitioned to be entirely under the management of the Red Hook Initiative, a community partner to Green City Force (GCF) until 2019, and thus was not part of data collection for the FEW-Meter project in 2020.


DASHBOARD

‘The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops, the quantity of food that has been grown and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening, between March 2019 and the end of November 2020. Charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication’.

WATER

The water chart visualises in a bar the progressive consumption of water and electricity across some months of the year, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilogram of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption. The total water consumption for this case study was calculated as an estimate based on water flow rate and time per week spent watering; the consumption is reported as a total over the whole season.

FOOD

The harvest chart, rather than showing harvest per month, shows the weight of the crops that were picked together with the quantity of kilograms per meter squared of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which in some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the quantity of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

‘Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. The charts refer to answers given by all US case study participants and not to one single allotment plot holder'.

USA - Case Study 4
TYPE:
Community Farm
NAME:
Howard Houses Farm
ADDRESS:
Howard Houses, 60 Glenmore Avenue, Brownsville, Brooklyn
SIZE:
3035 m2

 

DESCRIPTION:
The Howard Houses Farm is a ¾ acre (3035 m2) farm built in 2016 on the Howard Houses campus, a NYCHA development in Brownsville, Brooklyn. The farm was built and is operated by young public housing residents (ages 18-24) who are part of a federal public service program called AmeriCorps Green City Force that provides professional development and skill-building opportunities with an emphasis on sustainability and community cohesion; the farm is also partnered with community-based organization the Isabahlia Ladies of Elegance Foundation, a non-profit dedicated to strengthening community families in honor of Isabahlia Martin Oritz. The farm aims to achieve four goals: youth development and workforce training, landscape transformation, community engagement, and improved nutrition and dietary behaviors among residents. The farm hosts farm stands twice a week, giving the produce harvested at the farm to public housing residents for free in exchange for their kitchen scraps for composting or volunteer time at the farm. The youth also host cooking demonstrations and other nutritional programming, farm-based learning for school children, and community events like harvest festivals and volunteer days. The farm uses raised beds to grow crops and adheres to environmentally sustainable farming practices, using strategies like companion planting and integrated pest management. The organization managing the community farm is committed to achieving a closed-loop metabolism, aiming to ultimately integrate captured rainwater and compost produced on-site in the operation of the farm.


DASHBOARD

‘The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops, the quantity of food that has been grown and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening, between March 2019 and the end of November 2020. Charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication’.

WATER

The water chart visualises in a bar the progressive consumption of water and electricity across some months of the year, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilogram of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption. The total water consumption for this case study was calculated as an estimate based on water flow rate and time per week spent watering; the consumption is reported as a total over the whole season.

FOOD

The harvest chart, rather than showing harvest per month, shows the weight of the crops that were picked together with the quantity of kilograms per meter squared of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which in some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the quantity of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

‘Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. The charts refer to answers given by all US case study participants and not to one single allotment plot holder'.

USA - Case Study 5
TYPE:
Community Farm
NAME:
Bay View Houses Farm
ADDRESS:
Bay View Houses, 2085 Rockaway Parkway, Canarsie, Brooklyn
SIZE:
8094 m2

 

DESCRIPTION:
The Bay View Houses farm is a 2 acre (8094 m2) farm built in 2016 on the Bay View Houses campus, a NYCHA development in Canarsie, Brooklyn. The farm was built and is operated by young public housing residents (ages 18-24) who are part of a federal public service program called AmeriCorps Green City Force that provides professional development and skill-building opportunities with an emphasis on sustainability and community cohesion; the farm is also partnered with East New York Farms, a non-profit whose mission centers around food justice, local sustainable agriculture, and community-led economic development. The farm aims to achieve four goals: youth development and workforce training, landscape transformation, community engagement, and improved nutrition and dietary behaviors among residents. The farm hosts farm stands twice a week, giving the produce harvested at the farm to public housing residents for free in exchange for their kitchen scraps for composting or volunteer time at the farm. The youth also host cooking demonstrations and other nutritional programming, farm-based learning for school children, and community events like harvest festivals and volunteer days. The farm uses raised beds to grow crops and adheres to environmentally sustainable farming practices, using strategies like companion planting and integrated pest management. The organization managing the community farm is committed to achieving a closed-loop metabolism, aiming to ultimately integrate captured rainwater and compost produced on-site in the operation of the farm.


DASHBOARD

‘The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops, the quantity of food that has been grown and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening, between March 2019 and the end of November 2020. Charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication’.

 

WATER

The water chart visualises in a bar the progressive consumption of water and electricity across some months of the year, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilogram of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption.

FOOD

The harvest chart, rather than showing harvest per month, shows the weight of the crops that were picked together with the quantity of kilograms per meter squared of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which in some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the quantity of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. The charts refer to answers given by all German case study participants and not to one single allotment plot holder.

USA - Case Study 6
TYPE:
Community Farm
NAME:
Mariner's Harbor Houses Farm
ADDRESS:
Mariner’s Harbor Houses, 132 Brabant Street, North Shore, Staten Island
SIZE:
4046 m2

 

DESCRIPTION:
The Mariner's Harbor Houses Farm is a 1 acre (4046 m2) farm built in 2018 on the Mariners Harbor Houses campus, a NYCHA development in North Shore, Staten Island. The farm was built and is operated by young public housing residents (ages 18-24) who are part of a federal public service program called AmeriCorps Green City Force that provides professional development and skill-building opportunities with an emphasis on sustainability and community cohesion. The farm aims to achieve four goals: youth development and workforce training, landscape transformation, community engagement, and improved nutrition and dietary behaviors among residents. The farm hosts farm stands twice a week, giving the produce harvested at the farm to public housing residents for free in exchange for their kitchen scraps for composting or volunteer time at the farm. The youth also host cooking demonstrations and other nutritional programming, farm-based learning for school children, and community events like harvest festivals and volunteer days. The farm uses raised beds to grow crops and adheres to environmentally sustainable farming practices, using strategies like companion planting and integrated pest management. The organization managing the community farm is committed to achieving a closed-loop metabolism, aiming to ultimately integrate captured rainwater and compost produced on-site in the operation of the farm.


DASHBOARD

‘The charts included in this ‘dashboard’ show resources that have been used to grow food on the area cultivated with edible crops, the quantity of food that has been grown and the perceived immaterial benefits accrued through gardening, between March 2019 and the end of November 2020. Charts are based on the data that gardeners have collected with much dedication’.

WATER

The water chart visualises in a bar the progressive consumption of water and electricity across some months of the year, together with the consumption per meter squared of food production area and kilogram of food harvested. The scale on the vertical axis of each chart shows the overall consumption.

FOOD

The harvest chart, rather than showing harvest per month, shows the weight of the crops that were picked together with the quantity of kilograms per meter squared of food production area, which gives an indication of the intensity of production.

TRANSPORT

We have added a chart for trips to the garden, which in some cases generate a considerable consumption of fuel. This chart, however, needs to be interpreted. For example, in big cities such as New York or London, public transport is sometimes unavoidable and the quantity of kilometres may be also a consequence of the willingness of volunteers who do not live next to the garden to travel long distances. It may also indicate that a particular garden attracts many volunteers.

IMPACTS AND MOTIVATIONS

‘Finally, we have included two charts that show the motivations that most drive volunteers and gardeners to dedicate their time to grow food as well as the related impact on their wellbeing. The charts refer to answers given by all US case study participants and not to one single allotment plot holder'.